Avoiding bus bunching: From theory to practice

Friday, January 13, 2017, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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The problem of bus bunching in a high frequency service has been largely studied in the literature.

This phenomenon is produced by three main factors

(i) the variability in travel time between stops;
(ii) variations in passenger demand; and
(iii) drivers’ heterogeneity.

In order to tackle this phenomenon a wide range of control strategies have been proposed, however, none of them had been successfully implemented on a large transit network with high frequency services.

In this talk, we present a control scheme based on a rolling horizon optimization problem that has been successfully implemented for real-time control of two high frequency services in Santiago, Chile.

Finally, the main results and challenges on the implementation phase are discussed.

Ricardo Giesen is the Director and Associate Professor at the Department of Transport...

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Research brown bag: Gentrification and mobility with Amy Lubitow

Wednesday, January 11, 2017, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

Amy Lubitow, a TREC researcher and assistant professor of sociology at Portland State University, gives a free talk titled: Inequities in Urban Mobility in Portland: Understanding Community Vulnerability and Prospects for Livable Neighborhoods. The talk is part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences' Research Brown Bag Series.

Gentrification and development are changing the face of many Portland neighborhoods. This talk will draw on data from focus groups and participatory mapping research with residents in SE and North Portland neighborhoods. The presentation will share findings on the patterns of movement reported by residents in gentrifying neighborhoods and will offer ideas and perspectives on how to plan for a sustainable future for all Portlanders.

The talk will be held at the Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 333, on the Portland State campus.

Webinar: State-wide Pedestrian and Bicycle Miles Traveled: Can we estimate it?

Tuesday, December 13, 2016, 10:00am to 11:00am PST

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Heard of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT)? Wouldn’t it be great to know the corresponding value for walking and cycling?

This webinar discusses options for estimating the miles people walk and bicycle on the state-wide level, by investigating the practical considerations of trying to compute these values for one study state.

What strategies can be used, and what data sources do these require?

How do these strategies compare?

How do PMT/BMT estimates vary based on...

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Pricing and Reliability Enhancements in the San Diego Activity-Based Travel Model

Friday, December 2, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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The estimation of demand for priced highway lanes is becoming increasingly important to agencies seeking to improve mobility and find alternative revenue sources for the provision of transportation infrastructure.

However, many modeling tools fall short of what is required for robust estimates of demand with respect to toll and managed lanes in two key areas:

  • The value-of-time is often aggregate and not consistently defined throughout the model system, and
  • The reliability of transport infrastructure is rarely taken into account.

This presentation describes an effort which implemented recommendations of the Strategic Highway Research...

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Realistic or Utopian? Coordinating Transit and Land Use to Achieve Equitable Transit-Oriented Development

Friday, November 18, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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Equitable transit-oriented development (E-TOD)—the prioritization of social equity as an outcome of TOD implementation—has become a U.S. DOT policy stance, an objective of many other government bodies, and part of many NGOs' missions. But is it feasible to coordinate transit and land use in ways that allow us to achieve these goals, or is this a classic example of a wicked problem?

This talk will use Portland as a case study to explore some of the internal contradictions inherent in E-TOD goals,...

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Webinar: The Association Between Light Rail Transit, Streetcars and Bus Rapid Transit on Jobs, People and Rents

Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 10:00am to 11:00am PST

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What are the job, residential development and market rent outcomes of Light Rail Transit (LRT), Streetcar Transit (SCT) and Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)?

LRT, SCR and BRT investments are spreading rapidly across the country but there is scant evidence of their effect on where people work and live, and effects on market rents as an indicator of value. This webinar will summarize several years of NITC-sponsored research into development...

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Lessons from the Development of a Guidebook on Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections to Transit

Friday, November 4, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PDT

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To improve safety and increase transit use, transit agencies and the jurisdictions they serve have to approach transit service as door-to-door not just stop-to-stop.

Walking and bicycling are key modes for transit access.

Working with the Federal Transit Administration, a team from Portland State University developed a guidebook on improving pedestrian and bicycle access to transit (forthcoming). As part of the guidebook process, the PSU team conducted case studies on best practices of recent efforts in Minneapolis, Los Angeles and Atlanta.

This...

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Smart Cities: Improving the Roadside Environment with Distributed Sensor Systems

Friday, October 28, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PDT

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The City of Portland is exploring how distributed “Internet of Things” (IoT) sensor systems can be used to improve the available data that is usable by city engineers, planners, and the public to help inform transportation operations, enable assessments of public health and equity, advance Portland’s Climate Action Plan goals, and create opportunities for economic development and civic engagement.

The City is currently looking at how low-cost air quality sensors can be used to improve and increase real-time understanding of transportation-related pollutants. However, the state of low-cost air quality sensor technology is not usable off the shelf due to sensitivity limitations and interference issues.

This talk will share the results of a pilot evaluation study conducted by the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) along with background on other roadside air quality...

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Webinar: Transit Signal Priority Evaluation and Performance Measures

Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 1:30pm to 2:30pm PDT

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Transit signal priority (TSP) can reduce transit delay at signalized intersections by making phasing adjustments. TSP is a relatively inexpensive tool to provide faster and more reliable transit service.  This webinar addresses TSP real-word performance measures as well as data integration and evaluation challenges. Results of the TSP evaluation in an arterial corridor in Portland, Oregon indicate that a timely and effective TSP system requires a high degree of sophistication, monitoring, and maintenance. TSP timing is crucial...

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Planning Transportation for Recreational Areas

Friday, October 21, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PDT

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Population growth and increased accessibility of formerly remote destinations have created new needs for planning mobility to and within recreational areas.

Transportation planners studying recreational travel face unusual travel-demand peaks, travelers who are often unfamiliar with their surroundings, and a uniquely important need for traveler and community communication. Planners must consider what characteristics of an individual area make it attractive to visitors, as well as local goals for the special resources of the area.

This presentation will characterize unique facets of mobility in recreational areas, and pose approaches to planning transportation systems to serve them.

Anne Dunning, Ph.D.,...

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