Consistent Estimation of Revealed Route Choice Preferences for Dynamic Transit Assignment

Friday, February 19, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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Dynamic transit assignment models have the potential to improve local transportation agencies’ capability to forecast the demand for public transit facilities under conditions of limited capacity or varying reliability. In order to be useful in practice, the simulated route choices of passengers in these models need to reflect the behavior of actual residents observed in local travel surveys. Most analysis methods of revealed route choice preferences developed to date have either (1) not been proven to provide consistent estimates or (2) required an untenable computation time for practical applications. Furthermore, no model of transit route choice has accounted for variability in both passenger behavior and vehicle arrivals.

This seminar will focus on an econometric framework that Hood Transportation Consulting designed to overcome these limitations in partnership with the second FHWA Strategic Highway Research Program, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission of the San Francisco Bay Area, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority, and the Puget Sound Regional Council. The framework is based on a recursive logit model where the traveler makes a series of dynamic choices...

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Webinar: Development of a Pedestrian Demand Estimation Tool

Thursday, February 18, 2016, 10:00am to 11:00am PST

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If you would like to receive continuing education credits such as PDH or CM, please make sure to complete this evaluation form once you've watched the entire video so that we have a record of your attendance.

Why model pedestrians?

A new predictive tool for estimating pedestrian demand has potential applications for improving walkability. By forecasting the number, location and characteristics of walking trips, this tool allows for policy-sensitive mode shifts away from automobile travel.

There is growing support to improve the quality of the walking environment and make investments to promote pedestrian travel. Despite this interest and need, current forecasting tools, particularly regional travel demand models, often fall short. To address this gap, Oregon Metro and NITC researcher Kelly Clifton worked together to develop this pedestrian demand estimation tool which can allow planners to allocate...

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An Analysis of Cyclist Path Choices Through Shared Space Intersections in England

Friday, February 12, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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Shared space is a traffic calming technique as well as urban design concept. Also known as ‘Naked Streets’, this technique strives to fully integrate the roadway into the urban fabric by removing elements such as lane markings, curbs, and traffic signs. By removing these elements and creating a more plaza-like space, these spaces become ambiguous and no user group has priority. The technique is relatively new, and the majority of existing research concerns pedestrians only.

This study focused on intersections in England with the goal of understanding how bicycle riders perceive and travel through shared space intersections.

Using video observations, this research analyzed the variations in the paths cyclists rode through the intersections and collected data on several variables related to both the cyclists and their interactions with the site itself such as helmet use and riding through crosswalks.

The analysis indicated that cyclists rode similarly through both shared and control intersections, and that a large percentage of riders preferred to ride farther from motor vehicles when given the space to do so. This project offered further insight in how to best design shared space projects for nonmotorized users by looking at the spatial layout and the elements that most...

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Towards Effective Design Treatment for Right Turns at Intersections with Bicycle Traffic

Friday, February 5, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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The overall goal of this research was to quantify the safety performance of alternative traffic control strategies to mitigate right-turning-vehicle/bicycle collisions, often called "right-hook" crashes, at signalized intersections in Oregon.

A two stage experiment was developed in the OSU high-fidelity driving simulator to investigate the causal factors of right-hook crashes at signalized intersections with a striped bike lane and no right-turn lane, and to then identify and evaluate alternative design treatments that could mitigate the occurrence of right-hook crashes.

Experiment 1 investigated motorist and environmental related causal factors of right-hook crashes, using three different motorist performance measures:

  1. visual attention,
  2. situational awareness (SA) and
  3. crash avoidance behavior.

Data was collected from 51 participants (30 male and 21 female) turning right 820 times in 21 different experimental scenarios. It was determined that the worst case right-hook scenario occurred when a bicycle was approaching the intersection at a higher speed (16 mph) and positioned in the blind zone of the motorist. In crash and near crash situations (measured by time-to-collision...

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Student presentations from TRB, week 3

Friday, January 29, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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Andy Kading, Graduate Student Researcher, Portland State University

Topic: Managing User Delay with a Focus on Pedestrian Operations

Across the U.S, walking trips are increasing. However, pedestrians still face significantly higher delays than motor vehicles at signalized intersections due to traditional signal timing practices of prioritizing vehicular movements. This study explores pedestrian delay reduction methods via development of a pedestrian priority algorithm that selects an operational plan favorable to pedestrian service, provided a user defined volume threshold has been met for the major street. This algorithm, along with several operational scenarios, were analyzed with VISSIM using Software-In-The-Loop (SITL) simulation to determine the impact these strategies have on user delays. One of the operational scenarios examined was that of actuating a portion of the coordinated phase, or actuated-coordinated operation. Following a discussion on platoon dispersion and the application of it in...

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Student presentations from TRB, week 2

Friday, January 22, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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Nicholas Stoll, Graduate Research Assistant, Portland State University

Topic: Utilizing High Resolution Bus GPS Data to Visualize and Identify Congestion Hot-spots in Urban Arterials

The research uses high resolution bus data to examine sources of delay on urban arterials. A set of tools were created to help visualize trends in bus behavior and movement, which allowed for larger traffic trends to be visualized along urban corridors and urban streets. By using buses as probes and examining aggregated bus behavior, contoured speed plots were used to understand the behavior of roadways outside the zone of influence of bus stops. These speed plots can be utilized to discover trends and travel patterns with only a few days’ worth of data. Congestion and speed variation can be viewed by time of day and plots can help indicate delays caused by intersections, crosswalks, or bus stops.

This type of information is important to transit authorities looking...

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Assessing Travel Plans for Residential Developments

Friday, January 15, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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A ‘travel plan’ is a travel demand management strategy that contains a package of site-specific measures designed to manage car use and encourage the use of more sustainable transport modes. Much of the existing literature on travel plans focuses on their application in workplaces and schools. Travel plans can be required for new residential developments as part of the land use planning and approvals process. However, there is limited understanding of the extent to which they have influenced travel behaviour. This presentation focuses on the assessment of travel plans developed for new residential apartment developments in Melbourne, Australia. Consideration is given to both the quality of travel plans for new residential developments and their effectiveness in terms of their impact on travel behaviour.

Professor Geoff Rose is the director of the Institute of Transport Studies at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. Geoff's research and teaching activities cover sustainable transport,...

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Student presentations from TRB, week 1

Friday, January 8, 2016, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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Steven Gehrke, Ph.D. Candidate, Portland State University

Topic: An Activity-related Land Use Mix Construct and Its Connection to Pedestrian Travel

Land use mix is a central smart growth principle connected to active transportation. This presentation describes the indicators of local land use mixing and their association with pedestrian travel in Oregon’s Willamette River Valley. It argues that land use mix is a multidimensional construct reflected by the complementarity, composition, and configuration of land use types, which is positively linked to walk mode choice and home-based trip frequency. Findings from this study underline the conceptual and empirical benefit of analyzing this transportation-land use interaction with a landscape pattern measure of activity-related composition and spatial configuration.

...

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Cargo Cycles for Local and Last Mile Delivery: Lessons from New York City

Friday, December 4, 2015, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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Cities depend on safe and efficient goods movement to support community livability and a healthy economy. However, delivery of goods in an urban environment presents a tremendous challenge. Traditional motorized vehicles used for goods movement – ranging from cargo vans to box trucks - are inherently incompatible with (1) the multimodal street environments of modern cities, with clean, quiet conditions preferred by residents, and (2) larger environmental sustainability goals. As freight flows continue to grow with the demands of global trade, new urban freight and city logistics solutions are needed.

Cargo cycles – human powered cycles equipped with freight carrying capacity – offer a potential alternative to reduce freight externalities. This presentation will discuss the results of the recently completed “Freight Tricycles in New York City (NYC)” project, which aimed to evaluate the potential for cargo cycles as a local and last-mile freight transportation mode and to understand the traffic performance and externalities of cargo cycles compared to motorized delivery modes in NYC conditions.

...

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Three Bridges

Friday, November 20, 2015, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

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See the PSU Vanguard's coverage and video interviews on this seminar.

In the last decade, three important new bridges in the Portland area were the subject of intense discussion and analysis: the Tilikum Crossing, the Sellwood Bridge and the Columbia River Crossing. One of those bridges is completed, the second is under construction and the third one was canceled.

As a Metro Councilor, Robert Liberty was involved in the decision making process for all three projects. The way in which those projects were analyzed and presented to the public revealed to him a great deal about the many weaknesses in the way we make major transportation investment decisions. Those insights are the topic of his seminar presentation.

Robert Liberty has more than a third of a century's experience with the...

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