Friday, May 29, 2015 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

Two presentations from Portland State University's Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) program.

Transforming a historic highway in small town Mosier into a vibrant main street

Kaleidoscope Student Planners, a group of six students in the Master’s of Urban and Regional Planning program at Portland State University, are working with Mosier, Oregon’s City Council to develop the Slow Mo’ Main Street Concept Plan. The goal for the project is to develop conceptual designs and programmatic recommendations for historic Highway 30 (which runs through the town), to help ensure that Mosier’s Main Street reflects community priorities, supports a thriving downtown, and creates a safe and inviting corridor for people traveling on foot, by bike and by motor vehicle. During this seminar we will reflect on our process and discuss how we reached our final design concept and recommendations.

Kaleidoscope Student Planners is a group of six students in the Master’s of Urban & Regional Planning program at Portland State University. Members of the student team include: Amanda Davidowitz, Brandi Campbell, Kathy Wilson, Liz Kaster, Matt Lee, and Neil Heller. Check out our Facebook page at https://www....

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Monday, June 1, 2015 - 12:00pm to Monday, August 31, 2015 - 1:00pm
The Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation (IBPI) offers three exciting professional development courses each summer, invaluable for faculty and practitioners who work with bicycle and pedestrian topics.
Friday, June 5, 2015 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

In the U.S., women are far less likely to bicycle for transportation than men. Explanations include, among others, safety concerns (traffic and crime), complex travel patterns related to household responsibilities, time constraints, lack of facilities that feel safe, and attitudes. This talk will explore how this gender gap emerges in childhood, using data from the Family Activity Study. The study collected data from 300 Portland families (parents and children) over two years, allowing us to see how things change over time.

Jennifer Dill is a Portland State University professor and the director of TREC. She teaches courses in transportation policy, pedestrian and bicycle planning, and research methods. Her research interests focus on the interactions of transportation planning, travel behavior, health, the environment and land use. In general, she is interested in answering these questions: How do people make their travel and location decisions? How do those decisions impact the environment? How do our planning decisions impact people's travel and location decisions? Prior to entering academia, she worked as an environmental and transportation planner.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video here when made available.

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Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 10:00am to 11:00am

Findings from a Quasi-Experimental Study of Boltage Encouragement Programs

Much of the research on children’s travel to and from school has studied the impacts of the built environment. This three-year study contributes to current literature by investigating the role of socio-psychological factors in determining children’s travel behavior.

Boltage” is a novel intervention program that incorporates technology and social incentives to encourage children to walk and bike to school. By evaluating Boltage programs that have been implemented in two elementary and two middle schools, researchers conducted...

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Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 10:00am to 11:00am

Transit-oriented development (TOD) projects in low-income neighborhoods have the potential to provide needed transportation access to a segment of the population that stands to benefit significantly from these large-scale transit infrastructure projects. This research project reveals that large-scale TOD projects have the potential of leading to neighborhood revitalization and equitable outcomes in low-income Latino communities. But these positive outcomes depend on both the process and context of these particular neighborhoods, and how transportation planners incorporate the various forms of political, financial and cultural capital that exist in these communities into the planning and implementation process of TOD projects. This comparative case study analyzed the Fruitvale Transit Village in Oakland and the MacArthur Park METRO TOD in Los Angeles. We uncovered how TOD projects in Latino neighborhoods have the potential to improve access to regional transportation systems, increasing the number of affordable housing units, supporting local and diverse Latino retail businesses, and building upon existing social services. We conclude that TODs can help serve as catalysts for...

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Thursday, October 1, 2015 - 10:00pm to 11:00pm

Note: The date of this event is subject to change. It will be in October 2015.

More information coming soon. Check back closer to the date for more details, or sign up for our email newsletter to receive webinar announcements.