Student Presentations from TRB, Week 1: Smart Growth Neighborhoods & Real-World Cycling

Friday, January 20, 2017, 12:00pm to 22:00pm PST

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

Follow this link on the day of the seminar to stream it live.

Civil & Environmental Engineering: Steven Gehrke

A Pathway Linking Smart Growth Neighborhoods to Home-Based Pedestrian Travel

Land development patterns, urban design, and transportation system features are inextricably linked to pedestrian travel. Accordingly, planners and decision-makers have turned to integrated transportation-land use policies and investments to address the pressing need for improvements in physical activity levels via the creation of walkable communities. However, policy questions regarding the identification of smart growth indicators and their connection to walking remain unanswered, because most studies of the built environment determinants of pedestrian travel: (a) represent the built environment with isolated metrics instead of as a multidimensional construct and (b) model this transportation-land use relationship outside of a multidirectional analytic framework. Using structural equation modeling, this Portland, Oregon study identifies a second-order latent construct of the built environment indicated by land use mix, density, and urban design and transportation system features. Study findings suggest this construct has a strong...

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Webinar: Improving Walkability at Signalized Intersections with Signal Control Strategies

Thursday, January 26, 2017, 10:00am to 11:00am PST

The goal of signal timing at an intersection should be to maximize efficiency for all users. In many jurisdictions, however, traffic signals are timed mostly with the goal of reducing vehicular delay.

Other road users, such as pedestrians, deserve similar focus. In legacy transportation systems, pedestrians experience delays much in excess of those that would be deemed acceptable for a motor vehicle at the same location.

Excessive delay can lead to pedestrian frustration, non-compliance and ultimately decreased safety.

In the North American context, implementation of strategies to address pedestrian service varies greatly across jurisdictions, and there has been limited research on incorporating alternative pedestrian treatments at signalized intersections.

Recent updates to the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2010) have included specific multimodal delay modeling techniques offering a bit more accommodation to pedestrians, but still remain heavily vehicle-centric. While strategies such as an exclusive pedestrian phase and leading pedestrian intervals can help improve the safety of pedestrian operations, legacy service of pedestrians requires that they still must wait for their...

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Student Presentations from TRB: Week 2

Friday, January 27, 2017, 12:00pm to 13:00pm PST

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

Follow this link on the day of the seminar to stream it live.

Civil & Environmental Engineering: Travis Glick

Estimating Reliability Indices and Confidence Intervals for Transit and Traffic at the Corridor Level

As congestion worsens, the importance of rigorous methodologies to estimate travel-time reliability increases. Exploiting fine-granularity transit GPS data, this research proposes a novel method to estimate travel-time percentiles and confidence intervals. Novel transit reliability measures based on travel-time percentiles are proposed to identify and rank low-performance hotspots; the proposed reliability measures can be utilized to distinguish peak-hour low performance from whole-day low performance. As a case study, the methodology is applied to a bus transit corridor in Portland, Oregon. Time-space speed profiles, heatmaps, and visualizations are employed to highlight sections and intersections with high travel-time variability and transit low performance. Segment and intersection travel-time reliability are contrasted against analytical delay formulas at intersections with positive results. If bus stop delays are removed, this methodology can also be applied to estimate regular traffic travel-time...

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Student Presentations from TRB: Week 3

Friday, February 3, 2017, 12:00pm to 13:00pm PST

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

Civil & Environmental Engineering: Patrick Singleton

Exploring the Positive Utility of Travel and Mode Choice

Why do people travel? We traditionally assume traveling is a means to an end, travel demand is derived (from the demand for activities), and travel time is to be minimized. Recently, scholars have questioned these axioms, noting that some people may like to travel, use travel time productively, enjoy the experience of traveling, or travel for non-utilitarian reasons. The idea that travel can provide benefits and may be motivated by factors beyond reaching activity destinations is known as “the positive utility of travel” or PUT.

This study presents a conceptual and empirical look at the positive utility of travel and its influence on travel behavior. First, PUT is linked to concepts like utility, motivation, and subjective well-being, and categorized into destination activities, travel activities (multitasking), and travel experiences. Then, preliminary results from a 2016 survey of Portland-area commuters are presented. Finally, implications of the PUT concept for transportation planning and policy are discussed.

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Individual decision making in online public-participation transportation planning

Friday, February 10, 2017, 12:00pm to 13:00pm PST

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

The empirical evaluation of complex decision support systems is often limited to the self-reported satisfaction of the systems’ users. Such approach is problematic due to the conflation of the user's satisfaction related to the decision support system and the decision making process and its outcomes. In addition, it bears limitations that are common among most techniques that solicit participant-stated feedback. In this talk, based on data that was gathered by a web-based participatory system for transportation planning in the Puget Sound region, I present analytical methods for the empirical evaluation of decision support systems based on human-computer interaction. In addition, I discuss the extent to which self-centered and selfless decision making expressed itself in the transportation project choices of the users of the participatory system. The observed behavioral patterns suggest predominately self-centered choice making behavior of layman participants in online transportation planning.

Martin Swobodzinski is an assistant professor of geography, and director of the Center for Spatial Research and Analysis (CSAR) at Portland State University. He has a  Ph.D. from UC-Santa Barbara & San Diego State University, California. His research interests are Human-computer interaction, individual choice-making behavior, virtual reality, participatory decision making, knowledge...

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Friday Transportation Seminar: Topic TBA

Friday, February 17, 2017, 12:00pm to 13:00pm PST

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

More information about this seminar will be available soon. Check this page closer to the event date for more details. If you want to receive Friday Seminar announcements, sign up for our newsletter and check the box next to "Local events" and/or "Online events." You can unsubscribe at any time.

Friday Transportation Seminar: Topic TBD

Friday, February 24, 2017, 12:00pm to 13:00pm PST

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

More information about this seminar will be available soon. Check this page closer to the event date for more details. If you want to receive Friday Seminar announcements, sign up for our newsletter and check the box next to "Local events" and/or "Online events." You can unsubscribe at any time.

Friday Transportation Seminar: Lightweight Passive Data Model

Friday, March 3, 2017, 12:00pm to 13:00pm PST

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

More information about this seminar will be available soon. Check this page closer to the event date for more details. If you want to receive Friday Seminar announcements, sign up for our newsletter and check the box next to "Local events" and/or "Online events." You can unsubscribe at any time.

Friday Transportation Seminar: Topic TBD

Friday, March 10, 2017, 12:00pm to 13:00pm PST

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

More information about this seminar will be available soon. Check this page closer to the event date for more details. If you want to receive Friday Seminar announcements, sign up for our newsletter and check the box next to "Local events" and/or "Online events." You can unsubscribe at any time.

Friday Transportation Seminar: Topic TBD

Friday, March 17, 2017, 12:00pm to 13:00pm PDT

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

More information about this seminar will be available soon. Check this page closer to the event date for more details. If you want to receive Friday Seminar announcements, sign up for our newsletter and check the box next to "Local events" and/or "Online events." You can unsubscribe at any time.