Event Date:
Jan 16, 2015
Content Type: Professional Development Event

View Blanc's slides

View Mathez's slides

The video begins at 0:33.

Following the 2015 annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board, this Friday seminar will showcase some of Portland State University's student TRB research.

Presenters:

Bryan Blanc, GRA in civil and environmental engineering

Leveraging Signal Infrastructure for Non-Motorized Counts in a Statewide Program: A Pilot Study

Summary: Transportation agencies are beginning to explore and develop non-motorized counting programs. This paper presents the results of a pilot study testing the use of existing signal infrastructure – 2070 signal controllers with advanced software to log pedestrian phase actuations and detections from...

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Event Date:
Jun 08, 2007
Content Type: Professional Development Event

Two MURP presentations

The video begins at 4:18.

Event Date:
Jan 18, 2008
Content Type: Professional Development Event

Transportation mode choice is often expressed in terms of models which assume rational choice; psychological case studies of mode adoption are comparatively rare. We present findings from a study of the psychology of adoption for sustainable transportation modes such as bicycles, car sharing, and mass transit. Case studies were conducted with current and former participants in PSU’s ‘Passport Plus’ transit pass program, as well as a longitudinal cohort study of first-time winter bicycle commuters. Composite sequence analysis was used to construct a theory of the adoption process for these modes. Our findings suggest that mode evaluation is cognitively distinct from mode selection and has different information requirements. We conclude that public and private organizations could improve the adoption rate for these modes by tailoring their communication strategies to match the commuter’s stage of adoption.

View slides

The video begins at 9:01.

Event Date:
Feb 01, 2008
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 1:09.

Event Date:
Apr 11, 2008
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 2:08.

Event Date:
Apr 25, 2008
Content Type: Professional Development Event

View slides

The video begins at 3:00.

Event Date:
May 02, 2008
Content Type: Professional Development Event

View slides from Jennifer Dill's presentation

The video begins at 6:57.

Event Date:
May 30, 2008
Content Type: Professional Development Event

Steve Szigethy and Jamison Kelleher, a team of graduate students in PSU's Master of Urban and Regional Planning program, will present their Planning Workshop project entitled "Imagine 82nd." The project engaged residents, businesses, property owners and students along NE 82nd Avenue in Portland to develop a comprehensive vision for the future of the corridor. Imagine 82nd deals with the portion of 82nd Avenue between the Banfield Expressway and NE Sandy Boulevard, 1.3 miles in length. This particular stretch is home to many retail and service businesses that typify the rest of 82nd Avenue, but it also includes Madison High School, a major corporate headquarters, and a 20-acre vacant brownfield site. At this seminar, Steve Szigethy and Jamison Kelleher will present the vision concepts they developed with the community, with particular emphasis on transportation and land use components.

The video begins at 5:54.

Event Date:
Jan 23, 2009
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The proliferation of information technology in the transportation field has opened up opportunities for communication and analysis of the performance of transportation facilities. The Highway Capacity Manual relies on rules of thumb and small data samples to generate levels of service to assess performance, but modern detection technology gives us the opportunity to better capture the dynamism of these systems and examine their performance from many perspectives. Travelers, operations staff, and researchers can benefit from measurements that provide information such as travel time, effectiveness of signal coordination, and traffic density. In particular, inductive loop detectors show promise as a tool to collect the data necessary to generate such information. But while their use for this purpose on restricted‐access facilities is well understood, a great many challenges remain in using loop detectors to measure the performance of surface streets.

This thesis proposes 6 methods for estimating arterial travel time. Estimates are compared to simulated data visually, with input/output diagrams; and statistically, with travel times. Methods for estimating travel time are applied to aggregated data and to varying detector densities and evaluated as above. Conclusions are drawn about which method provides the best estimates, what levels of data aggregation can still provide useful information, and what the effects of detector density are on the quality of estimates....

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