Event Date:
May 09, 2008
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Event Date:
Oct 31, 2008
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Event Date:
Jun 12, 2009
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Classic highway traffic flow theory can explain the evolution of signals and waves once they form. Given sufficient boundary conditions the theory captures the evolution of the traffic state over space and time. But one rarely finds such ideal boundaries on real highways. Often disturbances arise within a region that classic theory would tell us should be homogeneous. These disturbances often grow and give rise to unstable traffic upstream, e.g., resulting in stop-and-go conditions during congestion with an increased frequency of accidents. This talk will examine one potential source of these disturbances, namely the fact that after a lane change maneuver drivers accommodate an entering vehicle quicker than a departing vehicle (mandatory accommodation versus discretionary accommodation). After illustrating this imbalance on two facilities, the talk will explain how it can give rise to lasting disturbances.

Dr. Coifman is an associate professor at the Ohio State University with a joint appointment in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science and the Department of Electrical Engineering. His research emphasizes extracting more information about traffic flow both from conventional vehicle detectors and emerging sensor technologies. His work has been recognized by the ITS America Award for The Best ITS Research and an NSF CAREER award. Dr....

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Event Date:
Jun 15, 2009
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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The LCN+ Project Management team are responsible for improving conditions for cycling on a 900-kilometre network of London’s key commuter roads, in line with the Mayor of London’s Cycling Action Plan.

With the initial target of achieving a 200% increase in the number of cyclists in London already surpassed, the project aims to build on this by continuing to advise the 33 London boroughs on how to improve cycling infrastructure on their roads. By effectively liasing with major stakeholders such as local cycling groups, Borough Cycling Officers and Transport for London, the project can ensure that all will have agreed on the solutions reached.

Steve Cardno: Steve is the Project Manager for the London Cycle Network Plus (LCN+) project, with responsibility for the overall project management of this London wide cycling project. The LCN+ project aims to deliver 900km of high quality strategic cycle routes across London by the end of 2009/10. The project is funded by Transport for London (TfL), project managed by Camden Consultancy Services and delivered in partnership with TfL, CCS, the 33 London Boroughs and...

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Event Date:
Jun 25, 2009
Content Type: Professional Development Event

Room 315 in the Engineering Building (the ITS Lab)

Abstract: This seminar will describe the results of a recent study for the Australian National Road Authority (Austroads) which reviewed emerging types of private vehicles, including everything from Segways and mobility scooters to three wheel cars and micro/mini cars, and their implications for road system management.The emergence of some of those vehicle types presents real challenges from the perspective of safely managing their integration into the road system even though they present some real opportunities from the perspective of improving the sustainability of the transport system. Although the analysis is largely from an Australian perspective, some of the general insights which came from the study are transferable and one of the key recommendations (regarding moving towards more performance based than prescriptive based standards for vehicles) has potential international application.

Event Date:
Jul 10, 2009
Content Type: Professional Development Event

ITS Lab (Engineeering 315)

Abstract: Despite the never-ending cascade of depressing economic developments recently, there are some encouraging new trends to be discovered. Some of these trends relate to the vehicles we buy and how we drive them, and the consequences of these actions. In this presentation, I will discuss several new findings about the positive influences of the recent economic changes on (1) the fuel efficiency of purchased new vehicles, (2) the amount and type of driving that we do, (3) how much carbon dioxide emissions we produce from driving, and (4) the number of road fatalities.

Bio: Dr. Michael Sivak is a Research Professor and the Head of the Human Factors Division of the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI). He received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the University of Michigan. Dr. Sivak's primary expertise is in perceptual and cognitive aspects of driving. Examples of his recent research topics include human-factors aspects of vehicle design, bounded rationality and driver behavior, and the relative risks of flying and driving. In 2001, he was named a Distinguished Research Scientist by the University of Michigan. In 2006, he received the A.R. Lauer Award from the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society for outstanding contributions to human aspects of the broad area of safety.

Event Date:
Oct 16, 2009
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Event Date:
Oct 30, 2009
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Driver distraction accounts for up to 30 % of accidents on the roadway. One of the leading causes of driver distraction is the concurrent use of a cell phone to talk or text message. In fact, accident rates are quadrupled for drivers talking on a cell phone and increase by a factor of 8 for those drivers texting. I will show that these impairments are primarily due to limitations in attention, and as such are not eliminated with hands-free devices. Cell phones cause a form of inattention blindness, wherein drivers look but fail to see important information in the driving environment, such as a child in a crosswalk. These impairments differ qualitatively from other seemingly similar sources of distraction (e.g., listening to the radio or books on tape, talking to a passenger, etc.) and are similar to the impairments associated with driving drunk. Efforts to practice away the dual-task interference have proven unsuccessful indicating that you cannot train yourself to become an expert cell phone driver. However, there are intriguing individual differences for a very small group of "supertaskers" who can, in fact, drive and talk on a cell phone with little or no impairment. Together these data have important implications for theories of attention...

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Event Date:
Feb 05, 2010
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Event Date:
Apr 02, 2010
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 3:01.

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