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Content Type: News Item
In 2014, NITC published a study on racial bias at crosswalks under a Small Starts grant. Read coverage of that project in the New York Times and Washington PostThe next phase of the research is now complete, with more comprehensive findings. 

Principal InvestigatorKimberly Kahn, Portland State University
Learn more about this research by viewing the two-page Project Brief, related presentations, and the full Final Report on the Project Overview page. Hear firsthand from the PI by tuning in for the webinar on October 26th (recording available post-webinar).

Led by Dr. Kimberly Kahn of Portland State University, the purpose of...

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Content Type: News Item

Everyday cycling for transportation can have positive, population-level health impacts.

Significant deterrents to cycling remain, however, particularly for women and minorities.

Narratives of Marginalized Cyclists, a NITC project conducted by Amy Lubitow of Portland State University, explores the experiences of women and minorities biking in Portland, Oregon.

Lubitow interviewed 28 Portlanders who self-identified as a woman or as a racial/ethnic minority (or both), and based on the insights gained from their stories, came up with a set of recommended interventions for planners to mitigate the barriers they experience.

"Institutionalized racism and sexism is hard to fix. These are complicated issues that involve multiple levels of interventions, but at a basic sort of smaller scale, there are things we can do," Lubitow said.

She chose participants who own a bike and ride it at least once a month, but not more than once a week. The primary aim of the project was to collect rich, narrative data regarding obstacles to routine or utilitarian cycling for women and minorities who already see biking as a viable form of transportation, but who make relatively few bike trips.

The interviews...

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Event Date:
Jun 05, 2015
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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In the U.S., women are far less likely to bicycle for transportation than men. Explanations include, among others, safety concerns (traffic and crime), complex travel patterns related to household responsibilities, time constraints, lack of facilities that feel safe, and attitudes. This talk will explore how this gender gap emerges in childhood, using data from the Family Activity Study. The study collected data from 300 Portland families (parents and children) over two years, allowing us to see how things change over time.

Jennifer Dill is a Portland State University professor and the director of TREC. She teaches courses in transportation policy, pedestrian and bicycle planning, and research methods. Her research interests focus on the interactions of transportation planning, travel behavior, health, the environment and land use. In general, she is interested in answering these questions: How do people make their travel and location decisions? How do those decisions impact the environment? How do our planning decisions impact people's travel and location decisions? Prior to entering academia, she worked as an environmental and transportation planner.

Event Date:
May 21, 2015
Content Type: Event

NOTICE: This event has been canceled and will be rescheduled at a later date due to an unforeseen conflict. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Seleta Reynolds, Los Angeles Department of Transportation

Despite its reputation as a city built for automobiles, Los Angeles has made huge strides toward promoting active transportation and transit. In a diverse city with a unique land use and transportation system, however, serving all residents poses a challenge.

It’s a challenge Seleta Reynolds, the general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation, is up for. In Los Angeles, equity and transportation are bound together and the city's transportation department must take on equity in a big way.

Heading an ambitious plan that includes doubling the number of people riding bikes, Reynolds encounters issues such as nurturing a walking and cycling culture in low-income...

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Event Date:
Feb 25, 2005
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Event Date:
Oct 14, 2005
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 8:53.

Event Date:
May 11, 2007
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 1:49.

Event Date:
Feb 20, 2009
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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The video begins at 8:13.

Abstract:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 provides comprehensive civil right protections to individuals with disabilities. ADA Title II requires every state and local government to prepare a self-evaluation plan to identify program access issues. From this, a transition plan is required showing policies and practices to achieve a barrier free environment. Although transition plans are required by the ADA, few cities have complied due to the high cost and complexity of conducting an accurate grade, cross-slope, and slab-to-slab faulting inventory assessment of their pedestrian facilities. Public works departments now are facing increased pressure to determine cost-effective and efficient methods for compliance with ADA accessibility standards. Failure to properly manage ADA compliance has proven costly to many cities throughout the country due to an increasing amount of litigation. The Bellevue Transportation Department decided to take a progressive approach to managing ADA compliance under a pilot program made possible by the Federal Highway Administration. The Ultra-Light Inertial Profiler (ULIP) is a specially-equipped Segway with an inertial profiling hardware sensor box that includes a displacement measurement...

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Event Date:
Apr 30, 2010
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Event Date:
Nov 05, 2010
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 1:13.

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Abstract: The development of transportation systems and the development of affordable housing are two very different kinds of processes.  One is logical, long-range and (mostly) orderly; the other is entreprenurial, many-layered and opportunistic.  This presentation will demystify how affordable housing is sited, financed and developed.  It will highlight places in this process where transportation planners might be able to intervene and partner with local jurisdictions and developers to generate affordable, sustainable living environments where both housing and transportation costs are considered.

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