Event Date:
Apr 17, 2015
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

DASH is the next generation activity based model being developed by the Metro Research Center. Upon completion, it will be one of the most advanced in the nation. This model will be used extensively in estimating the activity and travel response of individuals to policies and infrastructure investments. Compared to past models, it will include enhanced consideration of the socio-economic roles of individuals, discrete temporal dynamics, and intra-household dependencies.

Richard Walker is the manager for the Modeling Services Division at Metro. He manages the technical elements of all programs related to travel and landuse forecasting: including data collection, model development, and model applications. In addition, Mr. Walker currently serves as the chair of the Oregon Modeling Steering Committee – a statewide entity formed to promote collaboration between Oregon modeling agencies with regard to model development activities. As a recipient of a BS degree in civil engineering from Montana State University, he has been a member of the modeling...

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Event Date:
Apr 25, 2003
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 0:27.

Event Date:
Oct 10, 2003
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 1:09.

Event Date:
Oct 08, 2004
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 2:59.

Event Date:
Mar 11, 2005
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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Event Date:
Sep 27, 2005
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 5:58.

A system for modelling commercial movements has been developed for Calgary in Canada, implemented as part of the transportation system modelling used by the City of Calgary in policy analysis. This effort included an extensive set of surveys collecting information on the roughly 37,000 tours and 185,000 trips (within these tours) made in the Calgary Region, with its population of just over 1 million, by commercial vehicles on a typical weekday in 2001. The resulting system of models includes an agent-based microsimulation framework, using a tour-based approach, based on what has been learned from the data. It accounts for truck routes, responds to truck restrictions and related policy and provides insight into various aspects of commercial vehicle movements. All types of commercial vehicles are represented, including light vehicles, heavier single unit and multi-unit configurations. All sectors of the economy are incorporated into the representation, including retail, industrial, service and wholesaling. This modelling system has been integrated with an aggregate equilibrium model of household-related travel covering the Calgary Region, with the microsimulation processes being done in external Java applications.

Dr JD (‘Doug’) Hunt is a Professor of Transportation Engineering and Planning in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Calgary in Canada. He is...

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Event Date:
Oct 06, 2006
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 5:31.

Event Date:
Apr 06, 2007
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 5:10.

Event Date:
May 18, 2007
Content Type: Professional Development Event

The video begins at 5:40.

Current research at the Institute of Transport and Logistics Analysis of the University of Sydney, under Professor Peter Stopher, has been concentrating on using personal GPS devices to collect travel behaviour data of individuals. In this seminar, Professor Stopher will outline the several projects that have been conducted and are currently underway that are using GPS. He will describe the survey procedures, and then provide an overview of some of the results emerging from collection of such data. Of particular interest is that the GPS surveys are being conducted in most cases by using a panel, with at least two waves of data collection, and that panel members carry the GPS devices for anywhere from one week to one month. Initial studies of the variability in daily travel, where there are no fatigue effects from recording multiple days in a diary, are showing some interesting patterns and leading to some important conclusions.

Peter Stopher is Professor of Transport Planning at the Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies of the University of Sydney, a position he has held since the beginning of 2001. Previously he held academic positions and also worked as a full-time consultant in the USA since 1968. He obtained his B.Sc. (Eng) and Ph.D. from University College London in the 1960s. He has more than 40 years of experience as an educator and consultant in transport...

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Event Date:
Oct 05, 2007
Content Type: Professional Development Event

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The video begins at 4:00.

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