Bicycling Toward Equity:  Opportunities, Barriers & Policies for Vulnerable Groups

Friday Transportation Seminars at Portland State University have been a tradition since 2000. You can join us in person at 11:30 AM, or you can also watch online.

PRESENTATION ARCHIVE

THE TOPIC

This seminar will include two papers that will be presented earlier in the week at the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board in Washington, DC. 

Adaptive Bikeshare: Expanding Bikeshare to People with Disabilities and Older Adults

John MacArthur, Portland State University
Nathan McNeil, Portland State University
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The video begins at 1:32.

Topic: Four Types of Cyclists: What do we know and how can it help?

Labeling or categorizing cyclists has been occurring for over a century for a variety of purposes. Dr. Dill's research aimed to examine a typology developed by the City of Portland that includes four categories: Strong and the Fearless, Enthused and Confident, Interested but Concerned, and No Way No How. Unlike several other typologies, this widely referenced typology is intended to apply to all adults, regardless of their current cycling behavior. This seminar will present her findings, focusing on differences between the four types and a better understanding the market for increasing cycling for transportation.

The video begins at 0:32.

Copenhagen is world-renowned as a bicycle-friendly city. Since the 1980s, Copenhagen has been encouraging people to bicycle through an ambitious program that includes expanding the city’s bicycle network, building new cycle routes, and improving safety and security. Niels Jensen will highlight how the city has achieved high levels bicycling through its policies, actions and funding. Jensen has been actively involved in Copenhagen’s cycling renaissance for the past couple of decades. He has published articles and made presentations on topics such as cycle tracks, bicycle parking, and green wave corridors.

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As cities move to increase levels of bicycling for transportation, many practitioners and advocates have promoted the use of protected bike lanes (also known as “cycle tracks” or “protected bikeways”) as an important component in providing high-quality urban infrastructure for cyclists. These on-street lanes provide more space and physical separation between the bike lane and motor vehicle lane compared with traditional striped bike lanes. However, few U.S. cities have direct experiences with their design and operations, in part because of the limited design guidance provided in the past. There is limited research from North America on protected bike lanes, but preliminary evidence suggests that they can both improve the level of comfort of cyclists and potentially increase the number of people cycling. This research evaluates protected bike lanes in five distinct contexts varying in population, driving and cycling rates and cultures, and weather: Austin, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Portland, Oregon; San Francisco, California; and, Washington, District of Columbia. 

These five cities participated in the inaugural “Green Lane Project” (GLP) sponsored by...

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The video begins at 1:11.

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Summary: The most recent edition of the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) contains analysis procedures for measuring the level-of-service (LOS), also referred to as quality of service, provided by an urban roadway to bicyclists. The method uses different design and operating features of the roadway segment (e.g. width, motor vehicle volumes and speeds) to assess an LOS grade of A (best) to F (worst). These procedures are used by planners and engineers to recommend how existing streets could be retrofitted or new streets designed to better serve people on bicycles (and other modes). However, the current HCM does not include methods that address protected bike lanes (aka “cycle tracks” or “separated bike lanes”), only conventional striped bike lanes, shoulders, and shared streets. There are other methods for predicting comfort from a bicyclist’s perspective that do consider protected bike lanes, but they are either based only on expert opinion or on surveys in Denmark.

This presentation will describe how to evaluate the level-of-service of a protected bike lane using results from surveys conducted in the United States. The model developed by this project could be used to supplement the current HCM to objectively consider a wider range...

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The video begins at 0:27.

Dr. Kelly Clifton, associate professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at PSU, will present results from Clifton's recent study that aims to make connections between our travel choices and our consumer behavior. Based upon a survey administered in the Portland metro area in the summer 2011, the analysis examines the various influences on mode choices to local restaurants. Similarly, patron spending and frequency of visits are also analyzed with respect to mode to better understand these complex relationships. In this talk, there will be an emphasis on comparing patrons that choose non-automobile modes to those who take a private vehicle. These findings are useful as communities around the country try to educate the business community about the potential impacts of investments in cycling, pedestrians and transit. 

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The LCN+ Project Management team are responsible for improving conditions for cycling on a 900-kilometre network of London’s key commuter roads, in line with the Mayor of London’s Cycling Action Plan.

With the initial target of achieving a 200% increase in the number of cyclists in London already surpassed, the project aims to build on this by continuing to advise the 33 London boroughs on how to improve cycling infrastructure on their roads. By effectively liasing with major stakeholders such as local cycling groups, Borough Cycling Officers and Transport for London, the project can ensure that all will have agreed on the solutions reached.

Steve Cardno: Steve is the Project Manager for the London Cycle Network Plus (LCN+) project, with responsibility for the overall project management of this London wide cycling project. The LCN+ project aims to deliver 900km of high quality strategic cycle routes across London by the end of 2009/10. The project is funded by Transport for London (TfL), project managed by Camden Consultancy Services and delivered in partnership with TfL, CCS, the 33 London Boroughs and...

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Measuring and modeling cyclists’ comfort and stress levels

Some researchers have tried to categorize cyclists’ levels of traffic stress utilizing facility or traffic data that can be readily measured in the field, such as motorized travel lanes, travel speeds, and type of bicycle infrastructure.

This seminar will present data and modeling results utilizing two novel data sources:

(a) real-world, on-road measurements of...

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