A new paper in the Journal of Planning Literature by Michael McQueen, Gabriella Abou-Zeid, John MacArthur and Kelly Clifton of PSU took a look at micromobility. The article focuses on the role of new modes like shared e-scooters in the efforts to cultivate a more sustainable transportation system by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, providing a reliable and equitable transportation service, and enhancing the human experience. Their review of the literature shows that the sustainability impacts of these modes are at present mixed, and are likely to remain so without more targeted interventions by local stakeholders. Yet, the operations and use of micromobility systems are quickly evolving and hold promise for contributing to a more sustainable transportation system.

Read the online journal article, or access the free author version (PDF) here.

Orange e-scooters on the road in Portland, Oregon
Michael McQueen, Portland State University

Is shared micromobility the ideal first/last mile supplement to transit? Can electric scooters make it easier for historically disadvantaged populations to get around? In just three years, brand-new fleets of e-scooters have substantially disrupted and altered the urban mobility landscape. For proponents, it's tempting to view them as a new answer to old problems. A just-released study finds however, that while there is potential for improved mobility if they are paired with other interventions, the shiny rows of e-scooters parked around cities aren't a catchall solution for our longstanding issues.

Portland State University (PSU) graduate Michael McQueen surveyed nearly 2,000 PSU students in his masters thesis, "Comparing the Promise and Reality of E-Scooters: A...

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PRESENTATION ARCHIVE

OVERVIEW

Shared electric scooters (e-scooters) are fast becoming a mobility option in cities across the United States. This new micromobility mode has the potential to replace car usage for certain trips, which stands to have a positive impact on public health and sustainability goals. However, many aspects of this emerging mode are not well understood.This webinar explores the findings of three NITC studies examining transportation mode choices, safety, and public health outcomes of electric scooters.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

  • describe the ways in which electric scooters may provide new substitutive, complimentary or synergist transportation opportunities for different activities...
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OVERVIEW

Equity requirements in shared micromobility programs have become increasingly prevalent in recent years, but our understanding of the scope and breadth of these requirements has been relatively limited. To address this gap in understanding, we collected documentation about 239 shared micromobility programs from the U.S. and have compiled all the data into an online, interactive dashboard. In this webinar, we will discuss the kinds of equity requirements that are most prevalent, the strategies cities/agencies employ to operationalize equity, and the extent to which these programs are monitored and evaluated. We’ll present findings from our review of 239 U.S. programs, supplemented by five case studies.

In addition, we’ll introduce attendees to two practitioner-focused tools we created to accompany this work:

1) US Micromobility Equity Requirements Dashboard and

2) Shared Micromobility Equity Evaluation Tool

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this webinar, attendees will:

  • Understand the prevalence and types of equity requirements currently in place across 239 US e-scooter...
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Friday Transportation Seminars at Portland State University have been a tradition since 2000. With the start of 2019, we're changing it up a bit! The seminar will be delivered 11:30 am (sharp) - 12:30 pm, with additional discussion over coffee and donuts (protect the planet—bring a mug!) from 12:30 to 1:00 pm. You can also watch online.

Periodically, as part of this new format, we're teaming up with the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) to bring you special editions—featuring guest speakers from PBOT—merging our seminar series and the long-standing PBOT Lunch & Learn.

PRESENTATION ARCHIVE

Miss the seminar or want a look back?

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