Oct 30, 2012

Postdoctoral candidates Joseph Broach and Arlie Adkins (both at Portland State University) were recently awarded $15,000 fellowships to assist them in completing their dissertation research. They were awarded the fellowships through an open and competitive process available to PhD candidates at Oregon State University, University of Oregon, Oregon Tech, Portland State University and the University of Utah.

Joseph's research will explore a travel mode choice framework incorporating realistic bike and walk routes. His research will consider a more complete mode choice behavioral framework that acknowledges the importance of attributes along the specific walk and bike routes that travelers are likely to consider. The proposed framework will then be applied to revealed preference travel datasets collected in Portland, Oregon. Measurement of nonmotorized trip distance/time, built environment, trip/tour, and attitude attributes as well as mode availability and model structure will be addressed explicitly. Route and mode choice models will be specified using discrete choice techniques.

He moved to Portland in 2006 after completing a B.A. in Liberal Studies and M.A. in Economics at the University of Montana.  Lifelong interests in transportation and how people make decisions led him to the Urban Studies PhD program at PSU. During his time here, Joe has worked on a number of research projects related to transportation data and modeling: ...

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Oct 22, 2012

Internships are vital to connecting students with real-world practitioners and applying what they learn in the classroom. For student Stefan Bussey, this real-world experience was gained through working with the Signals, Street Lighting, and ITS Division at the Portland Bureau of Transportation. His assignment during his internship was to evaluate the pedestrian delay at 47 pedestrian crosswalk signals (also known as half-signals) across the city of Portland. 

He assisted in reviewing and modifying the signal timing at half-signals to make them more responsive to pedestrians. The changes he helped implement resulted in an overall 25.3% reduction in maximum pedestrian delay for the signals adjusted. The reduction in pedestrian delay at these crossings may help to increase foot trips and higher rates of pedestrian compliance. When asked about his experience working at the city of Portland, Stefan said, “What I got most out of the internship was a better understanding of how to time signalized intersections to better serve non-motorized modes of transportation while maintaining an acceptable level of service for motorized vehicles.” From the employer perspective, Peter Koonce expressed, “The internship was a great example of a student having a positive impact on the surrounding community by solving a real world problem. The City of Portland is fortunate to have the partnerships in place to have PSU work collaboratively to improve the sustainability of the...

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