Friday, May 8, 2015 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology is reshaping the civil engineering profession and offers many unique advantages. National efforts such as the 3D Elevation Plan (3DEP) are helping increase the availability of LIDAR data. LIDAR is one of the crucial technologies that is transitioning the world of civil and construction engineering from 2D paper-based design to 3D digital design. The high spatial resolution and accuracy capabilities of LIDAR have led to increased efficiencies, improved analyses, and more informed decision making.

A further advantage of this dataset is that multiple people can use the same dataset for a variety of purposes across multiple disciplines. The visual nature of the dataset also is more intuitive than traditional data acquisition and analysis techniques. This presentation will provide a brief background of LIDAR , its capabilities, limitations and platforms, and discuss its current and future role in civil engineering. Examples of a wide range of transportation, geotechnical, coastal, and structural engineering, science, and planning applications will be presented including development of mobile LIDAR guidelines for transportation applications, seacliff erosion in San Diego, CA, landslides and slope stability studies in Oregon, Alaska, and New Zealand, earthquake and tsunami damages...

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Friday, May 15, 2015 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

There is growing support for improvements to the quality of the walking environment, including more investments to promote pedestrian travel. Planners, engineers, and others seek improved tools to estimate pedestrian demand that are sensitive to environmental and demographic factors at the appropriate scale in order to aid policy-relevant issues like air quality, public health, and smart allocation of infrastructure and other resources. Further, in the travel demand forecasting realm, tools of this kind are difficult to implement due to the use of spatial scales of analysis that are oriented towards motorized modes, vast data requirements, and computer processing limitations.

To address these issues, a two-phase project between Portland State University and Oregon Metro is underway to develop a robust pedestrian planning method for use in regional travel demand models. The first phase, completed in 2013, utilizes a tool that predicts the number of walking trips generated with spatial acuity, based on a new measure of the pedestrian environment and a micro-level unit of analysis. Currently, phase two is building upon this tool to predict the distribution of walking trips, connecting the origins predicted in phase one to destinations. This presentation will focus on phase two, which is one of the first studies to focus on destination choices among pedestrians separately from...

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Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm

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Seleta Reynolds, Los Angeles Department of Transportation

Despite its reputation as a city built for automobiles, Los Angeles has made huge strides toward promoting active transportation and transit. In a diverse city with a unique land use and transportation system, however, serving all residents poses a challenge.

It’s a challenge Seleta Reynolds, the general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation, is up for. In Los Angeles, equity and transportation are bound together and the city's transportation department must take on equity in a big way.

Heading an ambitious plan that includes doubling the number of people riding bikes, Reynolds encounters issues such as nurturing a walking and cycling culture in low-income communities and making sure the wave of transportation technology doesn...

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Friday, May 22, 2015 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
New FHWA VMT Forecasts and Implications for Local Planning

or

Post-Apocalyptic Zombies Ate Oregon’s Post-Recession, ATR Regression

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

A summary of FHWA’s new national traffic trends assessment will be presented, including discussion of varied factors influencing forward-thinking forecasts. Examples of Oregon statewide vehicle miles travelled (VMT) and historic traffic trends from ATR stations in the Portland urban region and greater Willamette Valley will be highlighted. VMT, population and income data will be noted with implications on local transportation planning.

Andrew is an associate with David Evans & Associates, Inc., with over 28 years of experience in multimodal transportation planning with emphasis on sustainable community and Complete Street policy and plan development. He focuses on developing multimodal transportation plans with context-sensitive street standards and policies that implement enhanced bicycle and pedestrian use and circulation. His area of expertise includes measured pedestrian-access-to-transit connectivity, the implementation of growth management policies, and multimodal transportation funding and concurrency management policy and program enhancements that better integrate bicycle, pedestrian and transit system project priorities. Prior to...

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Friday, May 29, 2015 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

Two presentations from Portland State University's Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) program.

Transforming a historic highway in small town Mosier into a vibrant main street

Kaleidoscope Student Planners, a group of six students in the Master’s of Urban and Regional Planning program at Portland State University, are working with Mosier, Oregon’s City Council to develop the Slow Mo’ Main Street Concept Plan. The goal for the project is to develop conceptual designs and programmatic recommendations for historic Highway 30 (which runs through the town), to help ensure that Mosier’s Main Street reflects community priorities, supports a thriving downtown, and creates a safe and inviting corridor for people traveling on foot, by bike and by motor vehicle. During this seminar we will reflect on our process and discuss how we reached our final design concept and recommendations.

Kaleidoscope Student Planners is a group of six students in the Master’s of Urban & Regional Planning program at Portland State University. Members of the student team include: Amanda Davidowitz, Brandi Campbell, Kathy Wilson, Liz Kaster, Matt Lee, and Neil Heller. Check out our Facebook page at https://www....

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Monday, June 1, 2015 - 12:00pm to Monday, August 31, 2015 - 1:00pm
The Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation (IBPI) offers three exciting professional development courses each summer, invaluable for faculty and practitioners who work with bicycle and pedestrian topics.

TBD

Friday, June 5, 2015 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU

Check back here closer to the seminar date for more information, or sign up for our mailing list and choose "online events" to receive Friday seminar announcements.

Thursday, October 1, 2015 - 10:00pm to 11:00pm

Note: The date of this event is subject to change. It will be in October 2015.

More information coming soon. Check back closer to the date for more details, or sign up for our email newsletter to receive webinar announcements.