Exploring Drivers’ Attitudes and Behaviors toward Bicyclists: The Effect of Explicit and Implicit Attitudes on Self-Reported Safety Behaviors

Tara Goddard, Portland State University

Summary:

Bicycling in the United States is disproportionately unsafe as a transportation mode. Despite comprising a smaller share roadway users, bicyclists are twelve times more likely to be killed in a traffic crash with a car than car occupants (Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003). Bicyclists involved in a collision with a car are three times as likely to suffer a serious injury (Rivara et al., 1997) and significantly more likely to suffer a traumatic brain injury (Juhra et al., 2012) than bicyclists in non-automobile-involved crashes. Existing research into crash causation has focused on instrumental factors (e.g. intersection type, vehicle speed) but little research has probed the role of attitudes in interactions between roadway users (Musselwhite et al., 2010). Drivers’ attitudes toward bicyclists, and how those attitudes may affect drivers’ behavior, are a largely unexplored area of research, particularly in the United States. Bringing together social psychological theories with existing techniques for measuring driver attitudes and behavior, this research utilizes an online survey to measure drivers’ explicit attitudes and self-reported behaviors and test drivers’ implicit attitudes toward bicyclists. Understanding drivers’ attitudes toward bicyclists, and whether those attitudes predict behaviors, is integral to advancing goals of community livability that incorporate safety and environmental sustainability.

Project Details

Project Type:
Dissertation
Project Status:
Completed
End Date:
December 15,2016
UTC Grant Cycle:
Natl Dissertation Fellowships Fall '15
UTC Funding:
$15,000

Other Products

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  • Integrating explicit and implicit methods in travel behavior research: A study of driver attitudes and bias (PRESENTATION)
  • Drivers' Attitudes and Behaviors toward Bicyclists: Explicit and Implicit Attitudes and Self-Reported Safety Behaviors (PRESENTATION)
  • Drivers’ Attitudes and Behaviors toward Bicyclists: Explicit and Implicit Attitudes and Self-Reported Safety Behaviors (PRESENTATION)
  • Share the Road? Driver and bicyclist relations in the US (PRESENTATION)
  • Explicit and Implicit Attitudes and Self-Reported Safety Behaviours in US Drivers towards Bicyclists (PRESENTATION)
  • Exploring Drivers’ Attitudes and Behaviors toward Bicyclists: The Effect of Explicit and Implicit Attitudes on Self-Reported Safety Behaviors (PRESENTATION)