Post date: Mon, 03/23/2015 - 3:16pm
Event Date:
Apr 24, 2015
Content Type: Events

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The US 101 Corridor Mobility Master Plan in San Luis Obispo was a two-year planning effort that evaluated the 70 mile corridor on 12 performance measures. This collaborative effort was led by the San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG).

Performance based planning is becoming more important for agencies receiving State and Federal funding. Smaller, rural regional agencies will have to find ways to collect, report, and use performance metrics with limited resources. SLOCOG's first performance-based planning effort was the US 101 Corridor Mobility Master Plan, funded through a State grant.

Funding for this project came from a Partnership Planning Grant awarded by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) along with SLOCOG matching funds. The study team — made up of staff from 6 cities, the county, SLOCOG, Caltrans, the Air Pollution Control District, and the Regional Transit Authortiy — evaluated the corridor using 12 performance metrics and input from the public. 140 project alternatives were evaluated on several measures of effectiveness to determine which improvements were more beneficial to the corridor. SLOCOG used the results...

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Post date: Mon, 10/14/2013 - 3:07pm
Event Date:
Content Type: News Item

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has identified some “livability principles” which include healthy, safe and walkable neighborhoods and safe, reliable and economical transportation choices.

Transit agencies and local governments routinely use metrics to evaluate the performance of transit systems, but a uniform standard of transit data collection does not exist outside of the reporting requirements of the National Transit Database (NTD). Because of the types of data collected for the NTD, the focus of performance measurements is often on ridership and financial performance, leaving aside the question of livability.

In a new project sponsored by OTREC, Principal Investigator Marc Schlossberg, associate professor in the department of planning, public policy and management at the University of Oregon, along with co-investigators Jennifer Dill of Portland State University and Nico Larco, also of the University of Oregon, set out to create a set of tested and refined performance indicators that transit agencies across the nation can use to evaluate and improve their system performance in relation to livability goals.

Traditionally, transit systems are thought of exclusively in their wholeness: how the system serves a region, city or community. In order to evaluate...

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